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millions of dollars with every weather event. it means creating a living environment for the people of haiti, and the government has the instruments available, the tools available to it to make a goal of regional planning. these instruments, the national center, supported by funds from the european union and others for regional planning, which, again, you contribute to with your funds. i wish to thank you for this contribution. let me say that our administration will use these funds to the hilt. in the longer time frame, so we can leave our fingerprints on the haitian area. as you can see in this area, this is on the front of those helping us. europe is at the forefront, able to continue to inspire everyone, and as the world realizes, they cannot go it alone. it has to be in the regions, the larger regions, so we can find a single voice, so we can give each other mutual support while maintaining identity. i say to them that all of our strategies and their solidarity has not been wasted. those that are most vulnerable are the ones then have benefited the most. there is taking shape i
's about if you are immediately engaged in the work environment together, it's allowing for more opportunities selling someone to take on a new project or allowing someone to maybe how could i say flesh out ideas and actually put them in place and then learned from that because not everything is going to be perfect. but knowing that even if it doesn't come out right someone is going to say it's okay. it's okay. we are we to work on getting a better. i think that's where he learned the most about leadership and about how to conduct perfect but it is you want to do. men do it with men and with women, too to read these relationships are always down for women and we shouldn't be ashamed of that. >> we ask you what you were watching when you were 17 that would have made this a little bit easier and you said keep striving. never lose heart. it's not about how much time you get knocked down but it's about how many times you get back up and it's what you do after you get back up and brush yourself off that really matters. i just wondered if there was any specific time you could talk abou
bottles, even if you leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around
industry. together we put in place a stronger environment in which the private sector can create good paying jobs, and virginia is now outperforming its neighboring states. we have also worked hard together to get our fiscal house in order. three years ago, together we closed a budget shortfall of $6 billion without raising taxes. the results were good. we have had three consecutive budget surpluses totaling $1.40 billion. we more than doubled the rainy day fund. we gave two 3% performance bonuses to our great state employees. we have maintained virginia aaa bond rating while the federal government was losing theirs. we bolstered agency efficiency. we eliminated and consolidated dozens of boards and commissions and agencies and programs to save money. we set priorities and cut spending. in the last three years, i have recommended and you have accepted cuts and reallocations of spending of more than a billion dollars, and i thank you for that. we have made government live within its means. we put the most defunding into transportation since 1986 and stayed within zero or five%, self-im
afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concern. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already have given their approval to this relationship and value it as one that is good for afghanistan. in that context, the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve, and i am sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about during our conversations, and perhaps many times in that conversation, beginning with the composition of, of course. i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that those gains will be kept by any standard while we're working for peace and stability in afghanistan, including concern
to be so passionate about the environment specifically? >> because i have children, because the knowledge that we are devastating our national resources and that we continue to be addicted to the very thing that is killing us, fossil fuel, chemicals, power plants that are spewing fossil fuel, that we are addicted to them. they're killing us and we are not involved enough and there's not enough money behind alternative energy and there should have been. we could have done it, we haven't done it, we have to do it. global warming is happening. climate change is here. i don't want to be the person that doesn't talk about it. i don't want to be the person that denies it. there's too much science. there was a moment in the early 90s and that was when i had my first kid. i mean, this is really selfish, you know. i had my first kid and i thought, oh, my gosh. i started learning about what was really going on. they talked about greenhouse. remember, the time magazine said, "what is the greenhouse effect?" there was a moment where we were all really motivated and then i don't know what happened. pe
, as supervisors may know, the department of the environment for environment now program, we are working with the san francisco public utilities commission to do a grassroots multi-lingual outreach component to educate folks about their options under clean power sf. so, we do have that component and group of individuals that will be canvassing san francisco with respect to clean power. we have a group of outreach specialists that's specifically for energy watch. and at least from our perspective at this moment, the two are not mutually exclusive, but to not confuse a customer with multiple messages, we've kept the two programs, two outreach programs separate at this point. >> but there's no like firewall between the two -- >> i don't know if there is a firewall. it's something i'll have to get back to you and the committee on. if there is any prohibition between marketing these programs and clean power sf. >> following up on supervisor avalos' comments around where your outreach or where the program participants are, i know that you said that it narrows the merchant areas. i guess the qu
environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david
, tony testified in front of the environment and public works committee on why we need to pass and get the safe cosmetics out there on the floor of that senate, he did a fantastic job and i stole this off the video which is archiving, you can watch it, and this act would call for quick action on the chemicals of greatest concern, would increase access to basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on t
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional pane
2.5% or so, these companies have figured out how to make money in a slow growth environment so combined with that, 4%, 5% earnings growth, that's reasonable in the kind of environment that we're in right now. >> no great shakes in terms of earnings growth. >> no. >> but good enough is what you're saying. >> that's right. i think it's good enough. >> what's priced into the market though? i mean, we've got expectations that we'll see much higher prof materialize or what? >> you know, really i think the market, you know, the p.e. ratio, if you look at valuations as far as that metric goes, i mean, the market is not willing to take the pes very high, may inch higher, 14, 14.5 or so, by the end of next year. the market knows we're in a slow growth environment. we're not going to get strong gdp, and it's not willing to assign much of a pe to these earnings. that's going to be a continuation, but next year i think investor confidence is going to improve a little. it's really lagged in this rally, so i think we're just going to be able to inch it up enough to where we have a decent yea
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
is not hospitable environment. ed markey is running nomnation in liberal state. picking up green group nominations. that same day the league of conservation voters. i think more about that, than anything else. for him to be shocked people respond to tax policy is itself shocking. melissa: if you tax something, it is meant to discourage whatever behavior that is. shell responded and said while we're aware of the tax environment wherever we operate the driver for our operational decisions is going to be governed by safety. the tax policy in question i would add, by the way is that they were think of drilling on the outer continental shelf, there you would pay regular federal corporate income tax of 35%. otherwise, they were paying the alaska production tax which can be as high as 75%. i say if they were moving it for tax reasons they should just own it and get out in front of it. what is wrong with that? so you're moving it to go drill in a spot or keep it in a spot that is going to provide a better tax environment for you. this is company. isn't that what they're supposed to do? >> it is but also,
, as you point out, and what we are seeing is that the areas that have high lead in the environment also have low school scores, they are areas where the police are spending some time looking at in terms of high crime rates. that connection is clearly made when you start mapping. >> so there's at least three different layers of this research showing this connection. one is like the mapping of the relationships in the time they are occurring. the other is the time lag data about lead gasoline emissions and the kids who were exposed to it grow up, there's a crime wave. lead gasoline emissions go down. kids under the lower ones, there's lower crime. there's individual data about iq and blood levels. kevin, this report was terrifying to me. >> yeah. in addition to the statistical evidence, kids who grew up in the '50s, early' 40s and '50s. it affects their brain development. we have known for a long time lead affects iq and school scores. in the last ten years, there's a new line of evidence suggesting it affects areas of prefrontal cortex in the brain. those are areas that affect emotional
out space. it's so much easier to shut down a shop than it is in this environment. the colorado version of the law makes the law enforcement side of this much more challenging. >> and so the next thing that they could do is simply repeal it. and say if you're going to crack down on our regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, then do what you can. >> you might notice that some of the initial ones were rebellious by nature. i think marijuana users describe themselves -- some of them have a distaste for it being legal because they're now abiding with the law. if what there is is a very aggressive response you're going to tap in their rebellious spirit. >> we're seeing a breakdown of a federal relationship. michael will give us a broader context than what we're seeing. >> there is a sort of tempting federalism prospect on this which sees something along the following lines. and angela alluded to this. look, the resurgence of american federalism because states have preferences here. there's no reason. let's experiment. i don't think that's necessarily wrong. bu
's not only bad for the economy, but hurt the environment as well. "varney & company" is about to begin. karen anjeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they' gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> good morning, "varney & company," viewers. today is monday, january 7th and gerard depardieu, well, he's welcomed to russia with open arms and here, we're going to welcome with you open arms, with sandra smith and on the floor of the new york stock exchange, of course, nicole petallides. hey, you remember the cash for clunkers, that 2009 government program that gave people money, a the lot of money to buy more fuel efficient cars if they traded in the old gas guzzlers, as i
and how to give actionable advice requires knowing, and i would argue working in, environments that require close cooperation. that is why our job is not to wait for legal questions to be brought to us or to provide advice on operational decisions after those decisions have been made. our job is to be present at the beginning and throughout the process. just like other senior national security official across the government, the person in my seat, since the creation of nsd, has attended the morning terrorism threat briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigati
business. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in th
participation. how society and in these environments as the bonds weren't as strong as they were in traditionally organized places. these are arguments for a long time. design, aesthetic and social arguments. but then a big change has been 15 years ago, the economy started talking. nobody listens to planners. which is shouting in the wind about why we feel certain things are certain ways. but i will miss them so me say say this'll make you poor and this make you richer. the.or started saying, these communities are killing us, which i begin to and finally even more recently the environmentalists figured out the city was the way to save the country and the countryside. those three issues, none of which original research on our parts form the basis for having a much more legitimate and arguable support for city life over suburban life. so what are they? the first question to ask is where do people want to be in america? in portland is a prime example. during the 90s, journal and neil population increased by 50%, which was five times the rate. educated no one else went up so much ire
. where do you see this going? you talk about ticket prices going up a minimum 10%. in this environment it could go up more than that, couldn't it? >> absolutely. no question about it. the reality is if we don't have the seats out there, what is left will be exceeded by the demand and that means it going to go up. the other challenge, we have the regional unquote airlines. you have to pay probably three quarters of a million dollars to get trained just to get the privilege of riding as a copilot and living in newark and getting paid $30,000 a year. that doesn't encourage a lot of new entrants. >> neil: i guess not. michael boyd on all things flying or in this case not flying. i think abe lincoln just turned in his grave. nancy pelosi now using an amendment he all but inspired to bury us all. i'm william devane. ♪ i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of these risk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup inheir arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise
-- the environment is not good for outgoing epa chief lisa jackson. we'll explain. first, uncertain future as well for the next big thing in commercial aviation. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watcng. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >> bret: wildfires in australia top international news. it's summer down under and fighting fires there are difficult. 95 are burning in new south wales with 18 out of control. new rights for women in saudi arabia. king granted women 30 seats on the top advisory council for the first time. a big step in a country where women's lives are heavily restricted. women are not allowed to travel, work, marry or even be admitted to a public hospital without pe
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root and was, essentially, you know, became more or and more vir you lent. there were a number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya would in retrospect signal a, you know, to people who were watching this that things were not going well in libya, that essentially the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be, to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was the pass kerr in -- massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head of -- under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. and the east, you know, in a very tightly-knit tribal society an act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi, basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment a
of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we need to update the antiquated computer system. one day you're going to have terrible problems or you're going to have a kind of the system will break down, it's not going to cost $25 billion. it will cost $50 billion. >> there's another thing we don't talk about enough. we're talking about spending as if there's this generally irresponsible spending around. some of that might be true. the bigger issue is nilements, the growth in what those are going to cost us over time. that's the real threat. it's the one that is
fourchlg the taliban, to try to reshape the environment there, and to try to maneuver the various players in the region towards negotiated outcome because there was no military outcome. that seems not to have gone well. in the absence of that, what is the strategic course? the strategic course is now to minimize american vulnerability in these areas. not walk afrom afghanistan, as has happened in the past. try to give afghanistan some choices, but for security and to try to get away from what i think is the free riding problem where president obama is free riding on security, and not moving governments forward to get other stake holding in the rest of the country. i think the president has moved that security blanket in part to change the dynamic in the region. he is also committed to rebalancing attention on asia, and he is taking military forces out should they be needed for iran and other matters. this is a very shrewd, smart move that i think the wlous is making. >> now, what we're seeing here, as well, is that they -- we just -- we're told that there's a two-minute warning. they do n
unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyw
and corporate tax it is time to change so people can keep their own money and foster an environment where businesses want to invest andreate good paying jobs. he would hike the 4 percent sales tax and some say like it up to washington d.c., is that right or wrong? i am dave asbin. we'll go to steve and rich and mike and john, you love this idea and think it is good for the whole, country explain. >> one of the scandal is not the deficits, but the fact that federal government collects 2.5 trillion. with the consumption or sales tax, this is the lone way we can limit how much money gets to the federal government and more businesses would be created and jobs and the federal government would not be penalizing our work and we would get more work and jobs. >> sounds good to me, rick, to you? >> here's the problem. i will not touch incredibly regressive nature of this. >> by regressive, it hits the poor more than the rich? >> exactly. put the brakes on a economy, imagine what happens here. first of all, to keep the revenue neutral, you are looking at a 20r 30 percent sales tax . add that to the
's happening in our immediately environment and what we can see around us and what literally touches us physically. if you're walking through e woods d you hearhe crack of a stick behind you, your body immediately goes into a fear response, a fight or flight response. climate change isn't that kind of a problem. it's not an immediate, visceral threat. and i can say right now, this very day we can look out the window and there's co2, carbon dioxide, pouring out of tailpipes, pouring out of buildings, pouring out of smokestacks. and yet we can't see it, it's invisible. the fundamental causes of this global problem are invisible to us. and likewise the impacts are largely invisible to us as well unless you know where to look. so it's a problem that first of all we can't see. and secondly it's a problem that is seemingly faceless. it's not like terrorists who we can imagine who are coming after us trying to kill us and challenge our fundamental values. it's a problem that we can't see, that's going to have long term impacts that aren't going to just impact us now, but impact us into the fut
and -- svu has a children's room available which offers a safe environment for children exposed to family violence. child abuse is one of the toughest crimes for investigators. children are among the most vulnerable victims. thankfully there are those like kathy baxter who are constantly fighting for the prevention of child abuse. i believe partnership with outside agencies have allowed us to find justice during this complex investigation. another important component of svu is the -- unit. those members solely on internet crimes against children. the cases are complex and require persistent and dedication to identify and locate perpetrators who possess and distribute child pornography. we are only one of many law enforcement agencies across the region who actively participate in the silicon valley internet crimes against children task force. the investigation resulted in the arrest of four predators who possessed hundreds of images. as you can see we have many moving parts under the svu model, and it is important to recognize the specialist team appointed to investigate
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
temperatures -- from the freezing temperatures. >> we are always colder here than in the urban environments. >> garza can't afford to lose any of these endangered plants because they contain available genetic material. >> so in an over riding way we are conserving and preserving some of the species here that may go extinct extinct in the w. >> nice and warm. nice and warm. >> it is just as important to protect the pets at the berkeley east bay humane society. a sweater donation program is helping the rescue center which is still recovering from a fire two years ago. >> it is going to be cold again tonight. we get them buttoned up before they go home so they are nice and warm. >> the temperature was in the low 40s, but it wasn't enough to keep people from celebrating the weekend. in this weather some things sell better than others like japanese-style hot pots. >> when it is really cold outside we just want soup. so we decided to do hot potonig. >> another hot item, something the employees at the ace berkeley hardware store hadn't thought of until it started flying off the shelf. >> ant bait,
. economic growth is far from robust. another big problem is the low interest rate environment. >> essentially the challenge is the spread between what they can pay for deposits and what they can earn on loans because of these very low interest rates is compressed. that makes earning money difficult. >> reporter: that said, some argue it's a good time to buy bank stocks because valuations are still relatively cheap. at 11.2, the financial sector has the lowest price to earnings ratio of any group, based on projected 2013 earnings. jim sinegal isn't impressed. >> there's good reason banks should trade at lower multiple than other sectors. there's a lot of risk there. a lot of leverage and banks aren't going to be as profitable going forward as they were in the past. >> reporter: investors will be watching friday for more hints about the health of the sector. that's when wells fargo will become the first of the big banks to release fourth quarter numbers. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's "word on the street," electronics. how semiconductor giant in
are two of his "ten predictions" for 2013. >> so the key, susie, is we're in an environment where stocks continue to climb walls of worry, and the economy continues to muddle through, not similar to last year. last year the economy some days okay, some days not so okay, and the stock market kept climbing that wall of worry. last year stocks were up 16%, s&p 500, and we only need about half that to achieve a new all-time high. i think we'll get there. >> susie: bob, how do markets go higher when the individual investor is out of the picture, so fearful of investing in stocks. do we see the return of the individual this year? >> i wish i could say we're going to see that, susie. but the individuals who own a lot of bonds first need to see bonds going down in price to be willing to sell them to buy stocks. i think we hit a new all-time high without much participation by the individual. it is the corporation itself that has the big burially since the become oof 09. >> susie: you believe the emerging markets are going to do better than the u.s. so should investors focus outside the u.s.? >> i
mechanics beyond the traditional game environment. >> he suggested letting the readers vote on each other's postings so they could identify whose was most respected. >> a little light bulb, number one, one person thought his comment was insightful. >> by using this reputation system, the idea would be that entire community could work together to determine who should we pay attention to. >> each commentator gets more votes, they receive trophy badges. letting other readers know who is most popular. this in turn gets others engaged and it begins to feel like a game. >> whenever we engage with any kind of system, we ask what's in it for me? you better have a go ahead answer for that question, or it's empty and meaningless and people won't stay engaged. >> that kind of community recognition can be highly valuable, but it's also something that can't be bought for money. >> we were hitting little under 1 million page views per month at that time in '06. and today over this summer, we crossed the 6 million mark. it's been a very rapid increase in how much people are actually using it. >> part of
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
an interesting expression. she said, i grew up in an environment that was christian in which people followed their christian religion, others followed their muslim religion, and others their african superstitions. for me, this went to the heart of why the book was inevitable, or why, for me, i was engaged this this discourse all my life. it's very strange. i found it very interesting today, close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which for admitting what i believe or for believing what i do not believe to be considered of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that t
environment? >> i will say the film most like the political environment nowadays, of all of the ones that came out whether they were nominated or not was paranormal 4. because it is weird and just keeps happening over and over again. >> jennifer: i think it totally is listen kohn because people put him on a pedestal that stuck to his guns. and he did stick to his guns but he had to roll up his sleeves and do some of the horse trading that had to be done to get the horse trade done. >> yes the issue was not black and white, and there were so many things behind the scenes someone willing to flog through the mud in order to have the ends justify the means, and always along the way tell some pretty hilarious stories. >> stephanie: yeah for sure. so what is the best film that you would recommending of all of these for political junkies? what had you on the edge of your seat? >> it's tough because of the films that were nominated this year, a lot of them we knew what happened in the end. lincoln, you know they end up passing the 14th amendment. we know -- if you read
'neill at 9:00 tonight and signed the final agreement. we don't have that environment anymore. maybe that is good for the sunshine law but with intense media scrutiny and day-to-day negotiations it is tougher to get the deal done. i would like for them to go to camp david for one week. lori: with a chance to get spending cuts? will republicans have any leverage? >> there is opportunity to have responsible conversation. lori: that anything done? >> it is possible. the budget that was criticized the president has proposed drastic spending cuts and froze discretionary spending over five years not what democrats would be happy about what would follow if there was a deal. it is maybe a little less likely than one year ago but it is possible. lori: meno bernanke will leave at the end of the term. how will that unfolds? >> now -- now they say tim geithner will go to the head of the federal reserve. [laughter] i think he has had his do but it is a close relationship. it is with the entire board and not just the chairman. on lot of people have known them for a long time. lori: who will handic
's also worth noting that we're in a pervasive low interest rate environment right now and i'm concerned at some point, and we have been for successive quarters of us having an interest rate spike, if we have an interest rate spike and we've got inflation, all the loans outstanding, 85% by the way which the government holds, students have a heck of a time paying off the loans in a high interest rate environment, are we creating a debt burden on the students and being unfair to them at the end of the day and that's my main concern as far as this issue is concerned. >> susan, an alternative way to think about this, you don't automatically go to college and wait until you know exactly what you want to do or don't go at all. >> yeah, that's right. i mean, i think there's a case to be made if air not absolutely sure, you know, take your time. my wife, who is much smarter than prettier than i am you know, waited until she was 24, and really figured out what she wanted to do. went off to uc berkley graduated from straight a's and proved that, you know, you could benefit enormously. but there is
detrimental to the environment, so i think we should continue to wean our self off of that source and look into more environmentally friendly sources. >> there's no easy answer. drilling for oil can result in environmental disasters like the one recently in the gulf of mexico. and burning coal can add pollution to our air. while no one can guarantee that nuclear power plants can be completely safe, most experts agree plants can be designed to be safer than they are today. >> we see them all the time, but very few of us look closely, so here's this week's "flag facts." >> it's home to the oldest european settlement in north america -- st. augustine. it's where our rockets boldly launch into the final frontier. and if you prefer to boldly go a bit closer to earth, it's the nation's top destination for amusement parks. >> florida. >> florida. >> florida. >> like many state flags, florida features the state seal in the center. it used to be over a white background, but around 1900, the governor asked for the red cross to be added. he thought the mostly white flag suggested surrender. florida's
england, versus trying to raise kids in this environment and particularly in your environment of hollywood with a father who's a star? >> well, sure, and it poses challenges, especially like my autumn is the apple, the proverbial apple. she's studying theater and she wants to be an actress. education is very important and that's why i insisted that she not go right into the pool right away, that she get an education. of course, there is a lot of temptations and everything, but i think it's the same anywhere. you want to arm your children with everything that you can, impart every lesson that you can to them, talk to them and then have a level of trust in them that they've learned their lessons well, they're gonna make mistakes and you let go and let them do their thing. i think that's the truth anywhere you are in the country. hollywood might have some different challenges and there might be a certain level of difference, but i think it's the same anywhere. i think that kids can get into trouble anywhere. tavis: so you told autumn when she said to you that she wanted to be an actress that
they are going to be different given the political environment? >> in the past decades, cops have been marginalized, but after the revolution, cops have started to express their opinions freely. previously cops would protest inside the cathedral, but after the revolution they go outside of the state tv building. this is one of the positive goals. from my and i will try alongside all the bishops and priests to focus on the spiritual role of the church followed by the social role. therefore the political role will have no role left except to continue partisan politics. >> is it the tendency to try to pull the church out of politics? >> indeed, the church needs to remain out of politics. the church as a spiritual establishment. that is the primary role. it is also a social role to help with construction of services and schools and so on. >> banks are being allowed more flexibility in a crisis. they will have more assets that will be easier to turn to cash if they have problems. regulators still want banks to hold enough cash and assets they can sell quickly in case they run into trouble.
people to get around in a way that steps lightly on the environment. we want people to get around in ways that are enjoyable. and that really contribute to what makes san francisco special, such as our wonderful cable cars. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportation system if people can't get around safely. people need to not only be able to be safe, but to be able to feel safe, and nowhere is that more important than when you're on foot because that is when you're arguably the most vulnerable. it's also how every trip starts and ends. and many trips in san francisco, and we want more of them in between, to be on foot as well because it's a nicer way to enjoy the city. but if we want people to be out and walking, we need them to be safe. we want them to feel safe, and that's what we're here to talk about today. and none of that will happen without great leadership. so, without further ado, happy to bring up our great leader, the mayor of the city and county, ed lee. (applause) >> thank you. thank you, david.
will have significant effect on the environment due to unusual circumstances, you can't use a categorical exemption. a lot of our submissions, and those of -- in support of us which are part of the record talk about the congestion that would be increased, the circling of parking, the density of the neighborhood, the fact that there are wood framed structures in the neighborhood, fire safety would be impeded. i mean they remove the bulb-out at filleti's market because the struks can't get by. if a delivery truck can't get by what about fire trucks. when you look at the entire neighborhood as a whole and combined with the fact that you have these raised concrete plantares which are totally new and unique and they are a part of the permanent physical structure, and the fact that you have about 29 or 31 driveways on the scott -- i mean on oak, that would be impacted, just again getting to the density of people having to back in and out, past this bike lane, and when you consider that not many bicycles don't use lights, day or night, many of them blow through red lights, they -- you know, they
's take what we're doing specifically. with our sfpuc, with the department of the environment and melanie is here today and doing a great job with our mos connie center and i know we have a lot of panels up there already but doesn't fill all the roof tops and there is new technology coming out all the time. we have been challenged in the solar technology arena because traditional technology has heavy weight technology that always challenged the integrity of roof tops, and moscone is the one we found and let that be for one of these companies and light ultralight technology and use, cheaper way of getting solar out there and we're going to allow them to demonstrate their product on top of our mos connie roof and that is an example we're doing in utilizing all of the agency's cooperations and make sure the start ups can use real testing sites in the city. that is thanks to the hardand kelly and the manager at puc and barbara hale and the second thing we're going to do is take a page out of what we're doing with clean tech and biotech life sciences. you see what mission bay is doing. they
justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question and answer ses
a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing tre
of work on measuring levels of chemicals in people and environments, so one study she did was with also in richmond california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you would expect to be very different, and she's going to help us see if we can build a study, so this was a great thing that you brought to our attention. >> i start to think about it over the years but especially working in an airport and now in an actively working diesel pump station. >> and it's not something you have any control over, and that's the same kind of fragmentation we're seeing at all levels, it's hard to make changes when jurisdictions move. >> but if i could get her contact information or something after the presentation, that would be great. >> okay, cool. >> i had two questions, one is you were just saying to use glass when you're cooking or microwave, what about -- i was told before that you could use plastic for the refrigerator or storage, are you saying avoid plastics all together for food storage, and then the second question is water bottles, say for inst
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >> so, we're just going to take you through this really quickly. over 200 parks, over 1100 facilities are all contained within this. everything is based around you as a human being have your app. if you're looking for a park or if you're not familiar with any of the
stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the
to seven straight about 10 years ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
out of the house and excited about the environment. >> kids are kind of thinking well now is the time to be inside only. it's actually great time to be outside. now it's a great time to work for the environment. >> now tonight's episode of "the list" disappear into the magic of david london. that's on abc2 beginning at 7:00 and the thing i like most about the nature center? you get to get your hands dirty. >> also have great trails around there. if it is nice which it's going to be you can get outside. >> maybe don't take the kids. go yourself. >> see how charlie thinks. >>> stay with us this morning because school bus drivers running red lights and speeding. it's a story that we broke first here on abc2. >> yeah joce sterman did that and now city lawmakers are taking action in the hopes of keeping your children safe. today you can get involved and we'll explyou can go this weekend to get some really good meals without having an empty wallet. [ male announcer ] now at your neighborhood subway: the big hot pastrami melt. we perfected the pastrami sandwich -- filled with hot, juicy past
are two of his "ten predictions" for 2013. >> so the key, susie is we're in an environment where stocks continue to climb walls of worry, and the economy continues to muddle through, not similar to last year. last year the economy some days okay some days not so okay, and the stock market kept climbing that wall of worry. last year stocks were up 16%, s&p 500, and we only need about half that to achieve a new all-time high. i think we'll get there. >> susie: bob how do markets go higher when the individual investor is out of the picture so fearful of investing in stocks. do we see the return of the individual this year? >> i wish i could say we're going to see that susie. but the individuals who own a lot of bonds first need to see bonds going down in price to be willing to sell them to buy stocks. i think we hit a new all-time high without much participation by the individual. it is the corporation itself that has the big burially since the become ofof 09. >> susie: you believe the emerging markets are going to do better than the u.s. so should investors focus outside the u.s.? >> i th
, not dumping chemicals bad for the environment, a growing vegetables, how can that be something in violation? >> is a head scratcher. the municipal code is about political power. and right now stay at home gardening is on the rise so more cities will overturn the code but do we want to fight to grow our garden? gerri: it should be a given. more and more cases like this house are the courts responding? >> it is heartening. it is disturbing because property rights are a cornerstone of liberty you can say this is mine and you cannot say anything about it. with eminent domain of use and the epa is a huge violator have been doing a pretty good job they have been slapped down to the epa because they declared someone's land a wetland in you cannot challenge this while be fine you $75,000 per day. gerri: we heard about that. i knew about them in the domain. good reasons and very bad reasons. can and should americans fight back? >> absolutely. politics is messy but one rule is they will find the easiest path to get what they want. there is the case next week involving a guy who had a permit the city
hikes, what the environment will be like in washington, especially with a lot of republicans they seem to be running scad. >> that is where just as mayor giuliani said, the republicans should not run scared, they should tell the truth, and get the facts out to the people. >> jim: but they are not doing it. >> they are not doing it. maybe the mainstream media is ignoring them, this is a simple message, if you want to government to grow at the rate it is growing, and you are okay with this big government you see, you have to pay for it, a lot more than we are now, and a lot more than hiking taxes on the rich, now, but they can't get through the noise. >> well i don't see much of a attempt to try to get the facts out to the people, i think that have to figure out a way to connect with the people and be able to tell them the truth. you know margaret thatcher said that the problem with socialism or kd of government that obama is trying tony flick o to inflat sooner or later you run out of other people's money. neil: we might be seeing that now, a lot of americans seeing payroll taxut makeo
, a has been is missing but with children, have protection concerns in a can't environment or in an urban environment. and so we will look at that population and want to identify those, those people. sometimes people with medical conditions, they can't be treated in a camp. and makes them again more vulnerable and we will look at those populations. so it's kind of a broad array of vulnerabilities that we try to assess. >> ms. strack and, therefore, could you identify, we're talking about those who are eligible for consideration. there has been an identification of an emphasis on those who have participated in assisting the united states efforts either in the military intelligence, otherwise, nongovernment organizations have been put themselves into some peril. what is the distinction between those who are humanitarian versus those who have performed to the benefit of our interests and are therefore being given consideration because of the exposure that may result from that service? >> i would say the programs working in several ways to address both humanitarian concerns and those who work
presentations. we tend to work in rural areas comes i'm happy to hear about urban environment and what's going on. two questions for lives. i have recently chose to the ghostly the ghostly causa schemata was interesting is how communities are popping up across the street. somewhat ironic that are in fact there's no services out there. i'm wondering in the long term from its landing% is, communities, huge communities in areas with little resources, what is the long-term plan for these communities that do also include sort of the dwellers to vent hopes for what they want to be living. that's the first question. to bring services to them for help relocate again and how does that work? the second question -- i was sort of in knowing how you got to where you got to. i feel it in the spaghetti or is so often the government is not interested in addressing because there's so many entrenched and powerful interests. so i'm interested in knowing more about how you saw that movie forward. >> i'll answer your second question first because it's a little easier, which is included around the table with the pe
need predictable and their regulatory environment. the federal government shouldn't pick the winners and losers, or subject energy projects to endless and duplicative views -- reduce. such roadblocks have stymied vital products, like the keystone pipeline, and that must be built. we shouldn't stop epa's -- we should -- shouldn't have said it that way. it's getting wound up a little bit. we should stop epa's senseless and ideologically driven battle to ban the production and the use of coal. and we should continue with the next generations of nuclear power plants, and we should waste no time in pursuing research that develop alternative sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, and deficiency. that is where we have led the world. by fully embracing america's energy opportunity, we can accelerate growth, create millions of new jobs, free ourselves from less than stable global suppliers and create huge new revenues for government, which will help reduce our budget deficit. we also have an extraordinary opportunity to create growth and jobs through expansion of trade and investment and to
jointly. >> precisely. >> that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't even get a budget done. >> and the problem is we're going to have to do some of this anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you differ maintenance, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's penny-wise but pound pool foolish. the whole thing will break and cost you three times the amount. air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated air traffic systems. we need to update the computers. it's $25 billion. we're not spending that money because as you say spending is is a dirty word. but one day you're going to have terrible problems or you're going to have -- the system will break down. then it's not going to cost $25 billion. it will cost $50 billion. >> another thing we don't talk about enough. we're talking about spending as if there's this generally irresponsible spending. the bigger issue is entitlements, the growth in what those are going to cost us over time. that's the real threat, the one hardest to deal with because it's stuff peopl
on their balance sheets. but they're not investing and ask them why, they say, we don't know what the environment looks like. tell us what the environment looks like, so we can calculate the potential return on investments and we'll invest. if uncertainty prevails, the risk premium is very high and you price out a lot of investment activity that's good for everybody. >> they might go somewhere elsewhere they'll have more certainty. all of the fiscal cliff madness is about spending and revenue. in other words, what you would call a budget and there's nothing more broken in washington than the budget process. >> if you are not yet outraged. stay with us and you will be. people really love snapshot from progressive, but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched to progressive. the better i drive, the more i save. i wish our company had something this cool. you're not filming this, are you? aw! camera shy. snapshot from progressive. test-dr
for underprivileged children and the environment. >> hi. i'm so glad you could join me because i have an exciting story for you. a few short months ago, i suffered with inflammation, just like so many of you. the worst was in my hip. things like stairs and getting out of the car were hard for me. hiking is a passion for me; i've hiked all over the world. i've spent time in africa, hiked the copper canyon, been to the arctic, even the inca trail. but my hip got so bad, i couldn't do a basic hike anymore. i tried a lot of things, but nothing seemed to work. then i heard about nopalea. i'd love to tell you that i tried it right then and there, but i'm skeptical, so it sat on my kitchen counter until i thought, i have to try it. in about a month, the pain had diminished dramatically. eventually, i was able to plan my next hiking trip. my only regret is that i waited so long to try it. if you've suffered with inflammation or chronic pain for years, there is something that can help. that's why i'm here-- to share nopalea and more remarkable success stories with you. >> the nopal cactus is grown in the
think they represent necessarily the average parent who i think would prefer an environment where their child wasn't exposed to that kind of risk. >> vice president biden of course is working really hard at this and is meeting with a lot of groups. and speaking of federal law, would you be more comfortable if this was a federal law that would make it so that public schools could not have teachers who were armed or do you believe that should be up to the local districts? >> i think this needs to be a national consensus. i think we need a federal law on that. i don't -- i don't believe that -- if you create anomalous environments where those things are available, you have too much bleed thru, i think we need to have consistency across this. parents should feel comfortable regardless of where they live. >> rhonda, has there been any student reaction to this? what is their takeaway knowing the teachers in their schools may be secretly armed? >> well, i mean, you used the word "secretly." but we do have, as was mentioned, the law in the entire state of utah. and the bottom line is we a
environment so attractive and really few alternatives. is it really a function of the global economy, or is it more a function of this money that needs to find a place to go and u.s. equities seems to be best looking game in town? >> well, you know, i do think it's a lill bit of the latter. when you start looking at the velocity of the money, not trying to get too into the financial jargon, but we do have an issue where people are still seeking out safe money. however, if you look at growth of bank lending, commercial bank lending, what we call a credit growth, it's above 6% right now, so we do have banking and financial organizations wanting to lend money, and as they do that, that's going to create the capital to give those fundamentals that we sort of have forgotten about, but there's no denying that when the federal reserve is printing 85 billion a month it will have an effect. keep in mind, still looking at 8%, 10%, s&p corporate earnings growth. let's not get into an argument about top line growth. >> you're talking about the fourth quarter, 8% to 10% in the fourth quarter? >>
is summarize the threats we face in the broader strategic environment in which our counter-terrorism efforts take place. the death of osama bin laden marked a milestone in our efforts to defeat al qaeda. al qaeda's ranks have been decimated. more key leaders have been eliminated in rapid succession at any time since 9/11. virtually every major a al qaeda affiliate has lost its key leader or operational commander. more than half of their top leadership has been eliminated. al qaeda is on the ropes and continues to get pummeled. however, his death and the capture of many other al qaeda leaders and operatives do not mark the end of al qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core l
in the state of the union to work together. we have tried to create an environment where we would be able to work on things that have historically been challenging, but i think we need to do both. >> i think i am out of time. >> we will get the clock fixed. >> thank you for your service, mr. chairman. i want to draw attention to the last time you came before this committee. it was an unusual time were you did not just talk about a balanced budget, but as you referenced, you working with president clinton and this conference -- and this congress produced a balanced budget, something that no other president before or since has done in decades. our republican colleagues, when they took over instead of building on that success, they squandered that success. they never met a tax break that they did not like and they believed in the alchemy that those tax breaks would not for pay for themselves. that in addition to the tax breaks that they advanced, they advanced one increase in spending after another, increasing spending at an incredible rate without wanting to pay for it. after eight years of
on the environment. narrator: the streets of havana are lined with reminders of the island's colonial history. but just a hundred miles to the south civilization gives way to cuba's primeval past. over a million acres of unspoiled caribbean wetlands -- cienaga de zapata -- zapata swamp. [ thunderclap, rain splashing ] zapata is considered the most important wetland in the hemisphere, and despite the embargo, the swamp already draws thousands of visitors from north america every year. cuba is a way station for nearly 300 species of migratory birds that breed in the united states. encompassing the infamous bay of pigs, every fall, zapata is now home to a different kind of invasion. clouds of warblers, ibis cranes and herons leave their summer homes along the eastern united states on a direct flight to cuba. millions of birds in flocks so enormous they blanket the sky on radar images. some fly over 1,500 miles, from as far north as new england and canada. many spend their winter here in the caribbean's largest protected wetlands. some will simply pause before hopping across the
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